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Read the passage and answer the questions that follow on the basis of the information provided in the passage.

 The last half of my life has been lived in one of those painful epochs of human history during which the world is getting worse, and past victories which had seemed to be definitive have turned out to be only temporary. When I was young, Victorian optimism was taken for granted. It was thought that freedom and prosperity would speed gradually throughout the world by an orderly process, and it was hoped that cruelty, tyranny, and injustice would continually diminish. Hardly anyone was haunted by the fear of great wars. Hardly anyone thought of the nineteenth century as a brief interlude between past and future barbarism.

Qs.2/5: The victories of the past


Afilled men with a sense of pessimism

Bproved to be temporary events

Cended, cruelty, tyranny, and injustice

Dbrought permanent peace and security

Answer: Option B

Explanation:

Here is no explanation for this answer

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Read the passage and answer the questions that follow on the basis of the information provided in the passage.

 The last half of my life has been lived in one of those painful epochs of human history during which the world is getting worse, and past victories which had seemed to be definitive have turned out to be only temporary. When I was young, Victorian optimism was taken for granted. It was thought that freedom and prosperity would speed gradually throughout the world by an orderly process, and it was hoped that cruelty, tyranny, and injustice would continually diminish. Hardly anyone was haunted by the fear of great wars. Hardly anyone thought of the nineteenth century as a brief interlude between past and future barbarism.

Qs.3/5: The world 'definitive' as used in the passage means


Aincomplete

Bdefined

Ctemporary

Dfinal

Answer: Option D

Explanation:

Here is no explanation for this answer

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Read the passage and answer the questions that follow on the basis of the information provided in the passage.

 The last half of my life has been lived in one of those painful epochs of human history during which the world is getting worse, and past victories which had seemed to be definitive have turned out to be only temporary. When I was young, Victorian optimism was taken for granted. It was thought that freedom and prosperity would speed gradually throughout the world by an orderly process, and it was hoped that cruelty, tyranny, and injustice would continually diminish. Hardly anyone was haunted by the fear of great wars. Hardly anyone thought of the nineteenth century as a brief interlude between past and future barbarism.

Qs.4/5: During the Victorian age people believed that


Athere would be unlimited freedom

Bstrife would increase

Cpeace would prevail and happiness would engulf the whole world.

Dwars would be fought on a bigger scale

Answer: Option C

Explanation:

Here is no explanation for this answer

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Read the passage and answer the questions that follow on the basis of the information provided in the passage.

 The last half of my life has been lived in one of those painful epochs of human history during which the world is getting worse, and past victories which had seemed to be definitive have turned out to be only temporary. When I was young, Victorian optimism was taken for granted. It was thought that freedom and prosperity would speed gradually throughout the world by an orderly process, and it was hoped that cruelty, tyranny, and injustice would continually diminish. Hardly anyone was haunted by the fear of great wars. Hardly anyone thought of the nineteenth century as a brief interlude between past and future barbarism.

Qs.5/5: A brief interlude between past and future barbarism' can be interpreted as


Aa dramatic performance during wars

Ban interval between cruel wars

Ca short space of time between two great events

Da short period of time between past and future acts of savagery.

Answer: Option D

Explanation:

Here is no explanation for this answer

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Direction(145-149): Read the passage and answer the questions that follow on the basis of the information provided in the passage.

 Much of the information we have today about chimpanzees comes from the groundbreaking, long term research of the great conservationist, Jane Goodall.

Jane Goodall was born in London, England, on April 3, 1934. On her second birthday, her father gave her a toy chimpanzee named Jubilee. Jubilee was named after a baby chimp in the London Zoo, and seemed to foretell the course Jane's life would take. To this day, Jubilee sits in a chair in Jane's London home. From an early age, Jane was fascinated by animals and animal stories. By the age of 10, she was talking about going to Africa to live among the animals there. At the time, in the early 1940s, this was a radical idea because women did not go to Africa by themselves.

As a young woman, Jane finished school in London, attended secretarial school, and then worked for a documentary filmmaker for a while. When a school friend invited her to visit Kenya, she worked as a waitress until she had earned the fare to travel there by boat. She was 23 years old.

Once in Kenya, she met Dr. Louis Leakey, a famous paleontologist and anthropologist. He was impressed with her thorough knowledge of Africa and its wildlife, and hired her to assist him and his wife on a fossil hunting expedition to Olduvai Gorge. Dr. Leakey soon realized that Jane was the perfect person to complete a study he had been planning for some time. She expressed her interest in the idea of studying animals by living in the wild with them, rather than studying dead animals through paleontology.

Dr. Leakey and Jane began planning a study of a group of chimpanzees who were living on the shores of Lake Tanganyika in Kenya. At first, the British authorities would not approve their plan. At the time, they thought it was too dangerous for a woman to live in the wilds of Africa alone. But Jane's mother, Vanne, agreed to join her so that she would not be alone. Finally, the authorities gave Jane the clearance she needed in order to go to Africa and begin her study

In July of 1960, Jane and her mother arrived at Gombe National Park in what was then called Tanganyika and is now called Tanzania. Jane faced many challenges as she began her work. The chimpanzees did not accept her right away, and it took months for them to get used to her presence in their territory. But she was very patient and remained focused on her goal. Little by little, she was able to enter their world.

At first, she was able to watch the chimpanzees only from a great distance, using binoculars. As time passed, she was able to move her observation point closer to them while still using camouflage. Eventually, she was able to sit among them, touching, patting, and even feeding them. It was an amazing accomplishment for Jane, and a breakthrough in the study of animals in the wild. Jane named all of the chimpanzees that she studied, stating in her journals that she felt they each had a unique personality.

One of the first significant observations that Jane made during the study was that chimpanzees make and use tools, much like humans do, to help them get food. It was previously thought that humans alone used tools. Also thanks to Jane's research, we now know that chimps eat meat as well as plants and fruits. In many ways, she has helped us to see how chimpanzees and humans are similar. In doing so, she has made us more sympathetic toward these creatures, while helping us to better understand ourselves.

The study started by Jane Goodall in 1960 is now the longest field study of any animal species in their natural habitat. Research continues to this day in Gombe and is conducted by a team of trained Tanzanians.

Jane's life has included much more than just her study of the chimps in Tanzania. She pursued a graduate degree while still conducting her study, receiving her Ph.D. from Cambridge University in 1965. In 1984, she received the J. Paul Getty Wildlife Conservation Prize for "helping millions of people understand the importance of wildlife conservation to life on this planet." She has been married twice: first to a photographer and then to the director of National Parks. She has one son.

Dr. Jane Goodall is now the world's most renowned authority on chimpanzees, having studied their behavior for nearly 40 years. She has published many scientific articles, has written two books, and has won numerous awards for her groundbreaking work. The Jane Goodall Institute for Wildlife Research, Education, and Conservation was founded in 1977 in California but moved to the Washington, D.C., area in 1998. Its goal is to take the actions necessary to improve the environment for all living things.

Dr. Goodall now travels extensively, giving lectures, visiting zoos and chimp sanctuaries, and talking to young people involved in environmental education. She is truly a great conservationist and an amazing human being.

Read Full Paragraph

Qs.1/5: Read this sentence from the article.

'But she was very patient and remained focused on her goal'. What is an antonym for the word focused?


Abothered

Btired

Cdisinterested

Dconcerned

Answer: Option C

Explanation:

the other answers dont fit the description

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Read the passage and answer the questions that follow on the basis of the information provided in the passage.

 Much of the information we have today about chimpanzees comes from the groundbreaking, long term research of the great conservationist, Jane Goodall.

Jane Goodall was born in London, England, on April 3, 1934. On her second birthday, her father gave her a toy chimpanzee named Jubilee. Jubilee was named after a baby chimp in the London Zoo, and seemed to foretell the course Jane's life would take. To this day, Jubilee sits in a chair in Jane's London home. From an early age, Jane was fascinated by animals and animal stories. By the age of 10, she was talking about going to Africa to live among the animals there. At the time, in the early 1940s, this was a radical idea because women did not go to Africa by themselves.

As a young woman, Jane finished school in London, attended secretarial school, and then worked for a documentary filmmaker for a while. When a school friend invited her to visit Kenya, she worked as a waitress until she had earned the fare to travel there by boat. She was 23 years old.

Once in Kenya, she met Dr. Louis Leakey, a famous paleontologist and anthropologist. He was impressed with her thorough knowledge of Africa and its wildlife, and hired her to assist him and his wife on a fossil hunting expedition to Olduvai Gorge. Dr. Leakey soon realized that Jane was the perfect person to complete a study he had been planning for some time. She expressed her interest in the idea of studying animals by living in the wild with them, rather than studying dead animals through paleontology.

Dr. Leakey and Jane began planning a study of a group of chimpanzees who were living on the shores of Lake Tanganyika in Kenya. At first, the British authorities would not approve their plan. At the time, they thought it was too dangerous for a woman to live in the wilds of Africa alone. But Jane's mother, Vanne, agreed to join her so that she would not be alone. Finally, the authorities gave Jane the clearance she needed in order to go to Africa and begin her study

In July of 1960, Jane and her mother arrived at Gombe National Park in what was then called Tanganyika and is now called Tanzania. Jane faced many challenges as she began her work. The chimpanzees did not accept her right away, and it took months for them to get used to her presence in their territory. But she was very patient and remained focused on her goal. Little by little, she was able to enter their world.

At first, she was able to watch the chimpanzees only from a great distance, using binoculars. As time passed, she was able to move her observation point closer to them while still using camouflage. Eventually, she was able to sit among them, touching, patting, and even feeding them. It was an amazing accomplishment for Jane, and a breakthrough in the study of animals in the wild. Jane named all of the chimpanzees that she studied, stating in her journals that she felt they each had a unique personality.

One of the first significant observations that Jane made during the study was that chimpanzees make and use tools, much like humans do, to help them get food. It was previously thought that humans alone used tools. Also thanks to Jane's research, we now know that chimps eat meat as well as plants and fruits. In many ways, she has helped us to see how chimpanzees and humans are similar. In doing so, she has made us more sympathetic toward these creatures, while helping us to better understand ourselves.

The study started by Jane Goodall in 1960 is now the longest field study of any animal species in their natural habitat. Research continues to this day in Gombe and is conducted by a team of trained Tanzanians.

Jane's life has included much more than just her study of the chimps in Tanzania. She pursued a graduate degree while still conducting her study, receiving her Ph.D. from Cambridge University in 1965. In 1984, she received the J. Paul Getty Wildlife Conservation Prize for "helping millions of people understand the importance of wildlife conservation to life on this planet." She has been married twice: first to a photographer and then to the director of National Parks. She has one son.

Dr. Jane Goodall is now the world's most renowned authority on chimpanzees, having studied their behavior for nearly 40 years. She has published many scientific articles, has written two books, and has won numerous awards for her groundbreaking work. The Jane Goodall Institute for Wildlife Research, Education, and Conservation was founded in 1977 in California but moved to the Washington, D.C., area in 1998. Its goal is to take the actions necessary to improve the environment for all living things.

Dr. Goodall now travels extensively, giving lectures, visiting zoos and chimp sanctuaries, and talking to young people involved in environmental education. She is truly a great conservationist and an amazing human being.

Read Full Paragraph

Qs.2/5: What is the author's purpose in writing this article?


Ato entertain the reader with stories about chimpanzees

Bto inform the reader of the importance of wildlife conservation

Cto warn the reader about the challenges of working in Africa

Dto describe the work and life of Jane Goodall.

Answer: Option D

Explanation:

Here is no explanation for this answer

Workspace

NA
SHSTTON
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0 M:0 S
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147 / 927

Read the passage and answer the questions that follow on the basis of the information provided in the passage.

 Much of the information we have today about chimpanzees comes from the groundbreaking, long term research of the great conservationist, Jane Goodall.

Jane Goodall was born in London, England, on April 3, 1934. On her second birthday, her father gave her a toy chimpanzee named Jubilee. Jubilee was named after a baby chimp in the London Zoo, and seemed to foretell the course Jane's life would take. To this day, Jubilee sits in a chair in Jane's London home. From an early age, Jane was fascinated by animals and animal stories. By the age of 10, she was talking about going to Africa to live among the animals there. At the time, in the early 1940s, this was a radical idea because women did not go to Africa by themselves.

As a young woman, Jane finished school in London, attended secretarial school, and then worked for a documentary filmmaker for a while. When a school friend invited her to visit Kenya, she worked as a waitress until she had earned the fare to travel there by boat. She was 23 years old.

Once in Kenya, she met Dr. Louis Leakey, a famous paleontologist and anthropologist. He was impressed with her thorough knowledge of Africa and its wildlife, and hired her to assist him and his wife on a fossil hunting expedition to Olduvai Gorge. Dr. Leakey soon realized that Jane was the perfect person to complete a study he had been planning for some time. She expressed her interest in the idea of studying animals by living in the wild with them, rather than studying dead animals through paleontology.

Dr. Leakey and Jane began planning a study of a group of chimpanzees who were living on the shores of Lake Tanganyika in Kenya. At first, the British authorities would not approve their plan. At the time, they thought it was too dangerous for a woman to live in the wilds of Africa alone. But Jane's mother, Vanne, agreed to join her so that she would not be alone. Finally, the authorities gave Jane the clearance she needed in order to go to Africa and begin her study

In July of 1960, Jane and her mother arrived at Gombe National Park in what was then called Tanganyika and is now called Tanzania. Jane faced many challenges as she began her work. The chimpanzees did not accept her right away, and it took months for them to get used to her presence in their territory. But she was very patient and remained focused on her goal. Little by little, she was able to enter their world.

At first, she was able to watch the chimpanzees only from a great distance, using binoculars. As time passed, she was able to move her observation point closer to them while still using camouflage. Eventually, she was able to sit among them, touching, patting, and even feeding them. It was an amazing accomplishment for Jane, and a breakthrough in the study of animals in the wild. Jane named all of the chimpanzees that she studied, stating in her journals that she felt they each had a unique personality.

One of the first significant observations that Jane made during the study was that chimpanzees make and use tools, much like humans do, to help them get food. It was previously thought that humans alone used tools. Also thanks to Jane's research, we now know that chimps eat meat as well as plants and fruits. In many ways, she has helped us to see how chimpanzees and humans are similar. In doing so, she has made us more sympathetic toward these creatures, while helping us to better understand ourselves.

The study started by Jane Goodall in 1960 is now the longest field study of any animal species in their natural habitat. Research continues to this day in Gombe and is conducted by a team of trained Tanzanians.

Jane's life has included much more than just her study of the chimps in Tanzania. She pursued a graduate degree while still conducting her study, receiving her Ph.D. from Cambridge University in 1965. In 1984, she received the J. Paul Getty Wildlife Conservation Prize for "helping millions of people understand the importance of wildlife conservation to life on this planet." She has been married twice: first to a photographer and then to the director of National Parks. She has one son.

Dr. Jane Goodall is now the world's most renowned authority on chimpanzees, having studied their behavior for nearly 40 years. She has published many scientific articles, has written two books, and has won numerous awards for her groundbreaking work. The Jane Goodall Institute for Wildlife Research, Education, and Conservation was founded in 1977 in California but moved to the Washington, D.C., area in 1998. Its goal is to take the actions necessary to improve the environment for all living things.

Dr. Goodall now travels extensively, giving lectures, visiting zoos and chimp sanctuaries, and talking to young people involved in environmental education. She is truly a great conservationist and an amazing human being.

Read Full Paragraph

Qs.3/5: Which of the following is NOT one of the reasons Dr. Leakey chose Jane to work with him?


AShe knew a lot about Africa.

BShe knew a lot about African wildlife.

CShe earned the money to travel to Africa on her own.

DShe was interested in studying animals in the wild.

Answer: Option C

Explanation:

Here is no explanation for this answer

Workspace

NA
SHSTTON
9
Solv. Corr.
6
Solv. In. Corr.
15
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0 M:0 S
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148 / 927

Read the passage and answer the questions that follow on the basis of the information provided in the passage.

 Much of the information we have today about chimpanzees comes from the groundbreaking, long term research of the great conservationist, Jane Goodall.

Jane Goodall was born in London, England, on April 3, 1934. On her second birthday, her father gave her a toy chimpanzee named Jubilee. Jubilee was named after a baby chimp in the London Zoo, and seemed to foretell the course Jane's life would take. To this day, Jubilee sits in a chair in Jane's London home. From an early age, Jane was fascinated by animals and animal stories. By the age of 10, she was talking about going to Africa to live among the animals there. At the time, in the early 1940s, this was a radical idea because women did not go to Africa by themselves.

As a young woman, Jane finished school in London, attended secretarial school, and then worked for a documentary filmmaker for a while. When a school friend invited her to visit Kenya, she worked as a waitress until she had earned the fare to travel there by boat. She was 23 years old.

Once in Kenya, she met Dr. Louis Leakey, a famous paleontologist and anthropologist. He was impressed with her thorough knowledge of Africa and its wildlife, and hired her to assist him and his wife on a fossil hunting expedition to Olduvai Gorge. Dr. Leakey soon realized that Jane was the perfect person to complete a study he had been planning for some time. She expressed her interest in the idea of studying animals by living in the wild with them, rather than studying dead animals through paleontology.

Dr. Leakey and Jane began planning a study of a group of chimpanzees who were living on the shores of Lake Tanganyika in Kenya. At first, the British authorities would not approve their plan. At the time, they thought it was too dangerous for a woman to live in the wilds of Africa alone. But Jane's mother, Vanne, agreed to join her so that she would not be alone. Finally, the authorities gave Jane the clearance she needed in order to go to Africa and begin her study

In July of 1960, Jane and her mother arrived at Gombe National Park in what was then called Tanganyika and is now called Tanzania. Jane faced many challenges as she began her work. The chimpanzees did not accept her right away, and it took months for them to get used to her presence in their territory. But she was very patient and remained focused on her goal. Little by little, she was able to enter their world.

At first, she was able to watch the chimpanzees only from a great distance, using binoculars. As time passed, she was able to move her observation point closer to them while still using camouflage. Eventually, she was able to sit among them, touching, patting, and even feeding them. It was an amazing accomplishment for Jane, and a breakthrough in the study of animals in the wild. Jane named all of the chimpanzees that she studied, stating in her journals that she felt they each had a unique personality.

One of the first significant observations that Jane made during the study was that chimpanzees make and use tools, much like humans do, to help them get food. It was previously thought that humans alone used tools. Also thanks to Jane's research, we now know that chimps eat meat as well as plants and fruits. In many ways, she has helped us to see how chimpanzees and humans are similar. In doing so, she has made us more sympathetic toward these creatures, while helping us to better understand ourselves.

The study started by Jane Goodall in 1960 is now the longest field study of any animal species in their natural habitat. Research continues to this day in Gombe and is conducted by a team of trained Tanzanians.

Jane's life has included much more than just her study of the chimps in Tanzania. She pursued a graduate degree while still conducting her study, receiving her Ph.D. from Cambridge University in 1965. In 1984, she received the J. Paul Getty Wildlife Conservation Prize for "helping millions of people understand the importance of wildlife conservation to life on this planet." She has been married twice: first to a photographer and then to the director of National Parks. She has one son.

Dr. Jane Goodall is now the world's most renowned authority on chimpanzees, having studied their behavior for nearly 40 years. She has published many scientific articles, has written two books, and has won numerous awards for her groundbreaking work. The Jane Goodall Institute for Wildlife Research, Education, and Conservation was founded in 1977 in California but moved to the Washington, D.C., area in 1998. Its goal is to take the actions necessary to improve the environment for all living things.

Dr. Goodall now travels extensively, giving lectures, visiting zoos and chimp sanctuaries, and talking to young people involved in environmental education. She is truly a great conservationist and an amazing human being.

Read Full Paragraph

Qs.4/5: Which of the following is NOT true of chimpanzees?


AChimpanzees are often comfortable with strangers right away.

BChimpanzees eat meat as well as plants and fruit.

CChimpanzees use tools to help them get food.

DDifferent chimpanzees have different personalities.

Answer: Option A

Explanation:

Here is no explanation for this answer

Workspace

NA
SHSTTON
5
Solv. Corr.
15
Solv. In. Corr.
20
Attempted
0 M:0 S
Avg. Time

149 / 927

Read the passage and answer the questions that follow on the basis of the information provided in the passage.

 Much of the information we have today about chimpanzees comes from the groundbreaking, long term research of the great conservationist, Jane Goodall.

Jane Goodall was born in London, England, on April 3, 1934. On her second birthday, her father gave her a toy chimpanzee named Jubilee. Jubilee was named after a baby chimp in the London Zoo, and seemed to foretell the course Jane's life would take. To this day, Jubilee sits in a chair in Jane's London home. From an early age, Jane was fascinated by animals and animal stories. By the age of 10, she was talking about going to Africa to live among the animals there. At the time, in the early 1940s, this was a radical idea because women did not go to Africa by themselves.

As a young woman, Jane finished school in London, attended secretarial school, and then worked for a documentary filmmaker for a while. When a school friend invited her to visit Kenya, she worked as a waitress until she had earned the fare to travel there by boat. She was 23 years old.

Once in Kenya, she met Dr. Louis Leakey, a famous paleontologist and anthropologist. He was impressed with her thorough knowledge of Africa and its wildlife, and hired her to assist him and his wife on a fossil hunting expedition to Olduvai Gorge. Dr. Leakey soon realized that Jane was the perfect person to complete a study he had been planning for some time. She expressed her interest in the idea of studying animals by living in the wild with them, rather than studying dead animals through paleontology.

Dr. Leakey and Jane began planning a study of a group of chimpanzees who were living on the shores of Lake Tanganyika in Kenya. At first, the British authorities would not approve their plan. At the time, they thought it was too dangerous for a woman to live in the wilds of Africa alone. But Jane's mother, Vanne, agreed to join her so that she would not be alone. Finally, the authorities gave Jane the clearance she needed in order to go to Africa and begin her study

In July of 1960, Jane and her mother arrived at Gombe National Park in what was then called Tanganyika and is now called Tanzania. Jane faced many challenges as she began her work. The chimpanzees did not accept her right away, and it took months for them to get used to her presence in their territory. But she was very patient and remained focused on her goal. Little by little, she was able to enter their world.

At first, she was able to watch the chimpanzees only from a great distance, using binoculars. As time passed, she was able to move her observation point closer to them while still using camouflage. Eventually, she was able to sit among them, touching, patting, and even feeding them. It was an amazing accomplishment for Jane, and a breakthrough in the study of animals in the wild. Jane named all of the chimpanzees that she studied, stating in her journals that she felt they each had a unique personality.

One of the first significant observations that Jane made during the study was that chimpanzees make and use tools, much like humans do, to help them get food. It was previously thought that humans alone used tools. Also thanks to Jane's research, we now know that chimps eat meat as well as plants and fruits. In many ways, she has helped us to see how chimpanzees and humans are similar. In doing so, she has made us more sympathetic toward these creatures, while helping us to better understand ourselves.

The study started by Jane Goodall in 1960 is now the longest field study of any animal species in their natural habitat. Research continues to this day in Gombe and is conducted by a team of trained Tanzanians.

Jane's life has included much more than just her study of the chimps in Tanzania. She pursued a graduate degree while still conducting her study, receiving her Ph.D. from Cambridge University in 1965. In 1984, she received the J. Paul Getty Wildlife Conservation Prize for "helping millions of people understand the importance of wildlife conservation to life on this planet." She has been married twice: first to a photographer and then to the director of National Parks. She has one son.

Dr. Jane Goodall is now the world's most renowned authority on chimpanzees, having studied their behavior for nearly 40 years. She has published many scientific articles, has written two books, and has won numerous awards for her groundbreaking work. The Jane Goodall Institute for Wildlife Research, Education, and Conservation was founded in 1977 in California but moved to the Washington, D.C., area in 1998. Its goal is to take the actions necessary to improve the environment for all living things.

Dr. Goodall now travels extensively, giving lectures, visiting zoos and chimp sanctuaries, and talking to young people involved in environmental education. She is truly a great conservationist and an amazing human being.

Read Full Paragraph

Qs.5/5: Jane Goodall is now the world's most renowned authority on chimpanzees, having studied their behavior for nearly forty years. What does authority mean?


Aan intelligent person

Bone who studies animals

Ca scientist

Dan expert

Answer: Option B

Explanation:

Here is no explanation for this answer

Workspace

NA
SHSTTON
6
Solv. Corr.
43
Solv. In. Corr.
49
Attempted
0 M:0 S
Avg. Time

150 / 927

Direction(150-154): Read the passage and answer the questions that follow on the basis of the information provided in the passage.

 There are some men who seem to be always on the lookout for trouble and, to tell the truth, they are seldom disappointed. Listening to such men one would think that this world is one of the stormiest and most disagreeable places. Yet, after all it is not such a bad place and the difficulty is often in the man who is too thin- skinned. On the other hand, the man who goes out expecting people to be like himself, kind and brotherly, will be surprised at the kindness he meets even in the most unlike quarters. A smile is apt to be met met with a respective smile while the sneer is just as apt to provoke a snarl. Men living in the same neighborhood may live vastly different lives. But it is not the neighborhood which is quarrelsome, but the man within us. And we have it in out power to change our neighborhood into a pleasant one by simply changing our own ways.

Qs.1/5: The passage is about.


Aour disagreeable and hostile world

Ba kindly and pleasant world

Cour different and unresponsive world

Dthe world and what one makes of it.

Answer: Option D

Explanation:

Here is no explanation for this answer

Workspace

Companies take reading comprehension test to check the reading and grasping skills of the candidates. It also helps the companies to understand the pressure handling skills of the candidates. You can take mock verbal ability and reading comprehension test to master this skill and crack the job interviews easily.

You can search the set of questions by company (Please click on a company box under the tag cloud box) to filter the questions easily. You can also view the answer to understand the explanation or use the workspace for practice purpose. So, improve your verbal ability and reading comprehension skills today and crack the job interview comfortable with flying colors!

Verbal Ability Reading Comprehension Questions and Answers pdf

At Verbal Ability topic Reading Comprehension page No: 15 you will find list of 10 practice questions, tips/trick and shortcut to solve questions, solved questions, quiz, and download option to download the whole question along with solution as pdf format for offline practice. You can practice all the listed Verbal Ability Reading Comprehension topic questions offline too, by downloading the MCQs practice question of Reading Comprehension with detail solution, with formula/Tips & Tricks, with Solved examples and with top-rated users answers, which will give you best answer ascross webs. It is one of the perfect Reading Comprehension e-book pdf covering all types of questions in detail. These Verbal Ability test with answers pdf cover all types of question asked in IIFT, XAT, SNAP, GRE, GMAT, NMAT, CMAT, MAT or for IT companies written exam like Wipro, HCL, Infosys, Accenture, Government exams, IBPS Exams etc. There are multiple formats to download your online free Verbal Ability Reading Comprehension e-book, like fully solved, unsolved questions with Answers sheet. Even you can customize your ebook format by adjusting the given options in the download section to make it your one of the best Verbal Ability topic-based ebook. It is recommended to bookmark this page Verbal Ability Reading Comprehension for your preparation. Most of the students and fresher candidates finding it hard to clear the Verbal Ability section in exams. Here Given Reading Comprehension practice questions, quiz, fully solved questions, tips & trick and Mock tests, which include question from each topic will help you to excel in Reading Comprehension. Each test has all the basics questions to advanced questions with answer and explanation for your clear understanding, you can download the test result as pdf for further reference.

At Verbal Ability topic Reading Comprehension, you will get multiple online quiz difficulty wise, which will have a total of 6 quizzes, categorized as easy, medium, and moderate level. While preparing for any Reading Comprehension, take all the list quiz and check your preparation level for that topic. Each quiz have 10 different question, which needs to be answered in 20 min., all the listed quiz here is free, however, you will get only one chance for each quiz to attempt(Take Quiz seriously), so it is always recommended to take one quiz in each section before you start solving Reading Comprehension MCQs practice question, and one after solving all the question of the respective level, you can refer back your Reading Comprehension quiz result any time or you can download it as pdf for reference.

Verbal Ability Reading Comprehension Customize Online Mock Test

This is own type of mock test, where At this Verbal Ability Reading Comprehension MCQs mock test section, you will able to attempt only the questions related to Reading Comprehension, in that question will be a different level, important, and all the questions will be part of some of the mock tests across Q4interview FREE Mock test. You need to choose the topic as Reading Comprehension, and click on Double click to generate your customize mock test. While attempting the mock test you need to choose any of the one options out of given option. It is recommended to go through the direction given along with each question, as these questions will be randomly and so that same direction will not be applicable across the entire test. Once you submit your mock test, the result will be generated for Reading Comprehension Customize mock test, where your performance point points will be highlighted. Q4interview analysis every single point which helps you to improve your topic understanding and help you to know your type of mistakes and way to improve Reading Comprehension questions, by providing the same type of practice questions from practice exercise. The best part of this Reading Comprehension, all these mock tests listed here are free and you can take as Many time, as many you want. When you continue to give Reading Comprehension Customize Online Mock Test here regularly, then you will understand how much you have developed your accuracy on a topic, after that you will be able to decide how much attention you need to focus on. Your continued practice will increase your confidence, speed and thinking ability intensely, the Reading Comprehension Customize topic on which you will practice more will beneficial for you in future during campus placement.Reading Comprehension Mock Tests

Verbal Ability Reading Comprehension Quiz Online Test

The details of the Verbal Ability Reading Comprehension quiz are as follows. There are 10 questions for you. You have to answer them in 20 minutes. Within 20 minutes you have to see the errors in the sentences given as a question. Four options are also given to you, and you have to choose your opinion. You must be confident in your answer that the choices are difficult. Therefore, below we provide you with some information about Verbal Ability Reading Comprehension that you see and keep them in mind while answering questions.

Verbal Ability Reading Comprehension MCQs Practice Questions with Answer

On this Reading Comprehension section of page you will find the easiest quickest ways to solve a question, formulas, shortcuts and tips and tricks to solve various easiest methods to solve Reading Comprehension Question Quickly. It contains all the Verbal Ability topic Reading Comprehension questions which are common in any of the preliminary exams of any company. The solution is provided along with the questions. The practice of these questions is a must as they are easy as well as scoring and asked in all the exams They will confirm the selection if all the questions attempted wisely with little practice. It is recommanded to Take Mock test based on Verbal Ability topic and Reading Comprehension topic based quiz.

Verbal Ability Reading Comprehension solved examples question

Clarity of concepts is a must if you want to master the skill of solving Verbal Ability problems. This page contains sample Verbal Ability Reading Comprehension questions and answers for freshers and competitive exams. Reading Comprehension Questions with the detailed description, the explanation will help you to master the topic. Here solved examples with detailed answer description, explanations are given and it would be easy to understand. How to solve qReading ComprehensionVerbal Ability? Here are some examples solved with the Common Rules/tricks/tips of Verbal Ability. Enhance your chance to score maximum marks in Verbal Ability sections through. Error Spotting Grammar Questions Online Test for Free. Fully solved Sentence Formation MCQs questions with detailed answer description. Verbal Ability is an important topic for any exams but most aspirants find it difficult. You need to learn various tricks tips, rules, etc to solve quickly. At this page, you will find frequently asked Reading Comprehension questions or problems with solutions, shortcuts, formulas for all-important competitive exams like IT companies exams, interviews. It is always a best practice to go through the example and understand the types of question and way to solve it, so let's do some examples to calculate efficiency, read through all the given here solved examples. You can post your solution, tips, trick and shortcut if you have any in respect to questions.

You can get here fully solved Reading Comprehension examples with a detailed answer and description. You can solve Reading Comprehension problems with solutions, the questions by companies wise by filtering the questions, additionally, you can check what type of questions are being asked in IT companies Written Round from Reading Comprehension. Reading Comprehension became one of the most important sections in the entire competitive exams, Companies Campus, and entrance online test. Go through Reading Comprehension Examples, Reading Comprehension sample questions. You can Evaluate your level of preparation in Reading Comprehension by Taking the Q4Interivew Reading Comprehension Online Mock Test based on most important questions. All the Reading Comprehension practice questions given here along with answers and explanations are absolutely free, you can take any number of time any mock Test.

Why Verbal Ability Reading Comprehension?

In this practice section, you can practice Verbal Ability Questions based on "Reading Comprehension" and improve your skills in order to face the interview, competitive examination, IT companies Written exam, and various other entrance tests (CAT, GATE, GRE, MAT, Bank Exam, Railway Exam etc.) with full confidence.

Where can I get Verbal Ability Reading Comprehension questions and answers with explanation?

Q4Interview provides you lots of fully solved Verbal Ability (Reading Comprehension) questions and answers with Explanation. Solved examples with detailed answer description, explanation are given and it would be easy to understand. You can download Verbal Ability Reading Comprehension quiz questions with answers as PDF files and eBooks.

Where can I get Verbal Ability Reading Comprehension Interview Questions and Answers (objective type, multiple-choice, quiz, solved examples)?

Here you can find objective type Verbal Ability Reading Comprehension questions and answers for interview and entrance examination. Multiple choice and true or false type questions are also provided.