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Practice Questions & Answers :: AMCAT

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Read the passage and answer the questions that follow on the basis of the information provided in the passage.

 Vedanta philosophy was one of several thought currents from abroad that reached New England in the early decades of the 191h century and contributed to the thinking of Emerson and Thoreau. Emerson's interest in the sacred writing of the East probably began during his Harvard days and continued throughout his life. He knew Laws of Manu, Vishnupurana, the Bhagavad-Gita, and Katha Upanishad. There are numerous references to these scriptures in his journals and Essays. Thoreau too was introduced to Oriental writing while still at Harvard. His initial contact was with an essay in oriental poetry by Sir William Jones. In 1841, at the age of 24, he began an intensive study of Hindu religious books. In the January 1843 issues of "The Dial", Thoreau published selected passages from Laws of Manu. From a French version of the Sanskrit Harivansa he translated a story, "The Transmigration of seven Brahmans," and in "The Dial" of January 1844, he published excerpts from Buddhist scriptures under the title "The preaching of Buddha". Emerson, Thoreau, and other transcendentalists interested in the concept of "self-hood, found in Hindu scripture well-elaborated doctrine of self. Hindu scripture tells us that the central core of one's self (Antaratman) is identifiable with the cosmic whole (Brahman). The Upanishads state, "The self within you, the resplendent, immortal person is the internal self of air things and is the universal Brahman". Concepts similar to this cardinal doctrine of Vedanta appear in the writings of 2 the Transcendentalists. But there are many ideological similarities among oriental literature, the Neoplatonic doctrines, Christian mysticism, and the philosophy of the German idealists such as Kant and Schelling. And, since the Transcendentalists were acquainted with all of these writings, it is not always possible to identify specific influences.
Nevertheless, the striking parallels between Transcendentalist writing and Oriental thought make it clear that there was a spiritual kinship. In "Plato or the philosopher," Emerson writes that "the conception of fundamental Unity"-the "ecstasy" of losing "all being in one Being" - finds its highest expression chiefly in the Indian. Scriptures, in the Vedas, the Bhagavad Gita, and the Vishnu Purana." In this essay, Emerson quotes Krishna speaking to a sage: "You are fit to apprehend that you are not distinct from me that which I am, you are, and that also in this world, with its gods and heroes and mankind. Men contemplate distinctions because they are stupefied with ignorance," "What is the great end of all, you shall now learn from me. It is soul, - one in all bodies, pervading uniform, perfect, preeminent over nature, exempt from birth, growth, and decay, omnipresent, made up of true knowledge, independent, unconnected with unrealities, with name, species and the rest, in time past, present and to come. The knowledge that this spirit, which is essentially one is in one's own and in all other bodies, is the wisdom of one who knows the unity of things." In formulating his own concept of the Over-soul, Emerson might well be quoting Krishna once again: 'We live in succession, in the division, in part, in particles. Meantime within man is the soul of the whole; the wise silence; the universal beauty to which every part and particle is equally related; the eternal ONE. And this deep power in which we exist and whose beatitude is accessible to us is not only self -sufficing and perfect in every hour, but in the act of seeing and the thing seen; the seer and the spectacle, the subject, and the object, are one. We see the world piece by piece, as the sun, the moon, the animal, the tree; but the whole, of which these are shining parts, is the soul. Only by the. the vision of that wisdom can the horoscope of the ages be read .... ".'
In some respects, Henry David Thoreau was even more than Emerson attracted to Oriental thought and philosophy. For while Emerson found the Hindu doctrines of soul congenial to his own ideas about man's relationship to the universe. Thoreau found in Hindu scriptures away of life with which he felt a profound affinity. When Thoreau began his intensive study of Hindu Scriptures, he wrote in his journal. "I cannot read a sentence in the book of the Hindus without being elevated upon the table-land of the Ghauts. The impression which those sublime sentences
made on me last night has awakened me before any crow crowing. The simple life here in described confers on us a degree of freedom even in perusal wants so easily and gracefully satisfied that they seem like a more refined pleasure and repleteness." Later, in his first book, he said: " Any moral philosophy is exceeding rare. This of Manu addresses our privacy more than most. It is a more private and familiar and at the same time a more public and universal work that is spoken in parlor or pulpit nowadays. As our domestic fowls are said to have their origins in the wild peasant of India, so our domestic thoughts have their prototypes in the thoughts of her philosophers... Most books belong to the house and street only, and in the fields, their leaves feel very thin... But this, as if proceeds from, so I address, what is deepest and most abiding in man. It belongs to the noontide of the day, the midsummer of the year, and after the snows have melted, and the waters evaporated in the spring, still its truth speaks freshly to our experience ..... ".

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It can be inferred from the passage that the transcendentalist movement referred to in the passage revolves around,


AVishnupurana

BThe doctrine of self.

CThe law of Manu.

DOriental writing

Answer: Option D

Explanation:

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Read the passage and answer the questions that follow on the basis of the information provided in the passage.

 Vedanta philosophy was one of several thought currents from abroad that reached New England in the early decades of the 191h century and contributed to the thinking of Emerson and Thoreau. Emerson's interest in the sacred writing of the East probably began during his Harvard days and continued throughout his life. He knew Laws of Manu, Vishnupurana, the Bhagavad-Gita, and Katha Upanishad. There are numerous references to these scriptures in his journals and Essays. Thoreau too was introduced to Oriental writing while still at Harvard. His initial contact was with an essay in oriental poetry by Sir William Jones. In 1841, at the age of 24, he began an intensive study of Hindu religious books. In the January 1843 issues of "The Dial", Thoreau published selected passages from Laws of Manu. From a French version of the Sanskrit Harivansa he translated a story, "The Transmigration of seven Brahmans," and in "The Dial" of January 1844, he published excerpts from Buddhist scriptures under the title "The preaching of Buddha". Emerson, Thoreau, and other transcendentalists interested in the concept of "self-hood, found in Hindu scripture well-elaborated doctrine of self. Hindu scripture tells us that the central core of one's self (Antaratman) is identifiable with the cosmic whole (Brahman). The Upanishads state, "The self within you, the resplendent, immortal person is the internal self of air things and is the universal Brahman". Concepts similar to this cardinal doctrine of Vedanta appear in the writings of 2 the Transcendentalists. But there are many ideological similarities among oriental literature, the Neoplatonic doctrines, Christian mysticism, and the philosophy of the German idealists such as Kant and Schelling. And, since the Transcendentalists were acquainted with all of these writings, it is not always possible to identify specific influences.
Nevertheless, the striking parallels between Transcendentalist writing and Oriental thought make it clear that there was a spiritual kinship. In "Plato or the philosopher," Emerson writes that "the conception of fundamental Unity"-the "ecstasy" of losing "all being in one Being" - finds its highest expression chiefly in the Indian. Scriptures, in the Vedas, the Bhagavad Gita, and the Vishnu Purana." In this essay, Emerson quotes Krishna speaking to a sage: "You are fit to apprehend that you are not distinct from me that which I am, you are, and that also in this world, with its gods and heroes and mankind. Men contemplate distinctions because they are stupefied with ignorance," "What is the great end of all, you shall now learn from me. It is soul, - one in all bodies, pervading uniform, perfect, preeminent over nature, exempt from birth, growth, and decay, omnipresent, made up of true knowledge, independent, unconnected with unrealities, with name, species and the rest, in time past, present and to come. The knowledge that this spirit, which is essentially one is in one's own and in all other bodies, is the wisdom of one who knows the unity of things." In formulating his own concept of the Over-soul, Emerson might well be quoting Krishna once again: 'We live in succession, in the division, in part, in particles. Meantime within man is the soul of the whole; the wise silence; the universal beauty to which every part and particle is equally related; the eternal ONE. And this deep power in which we exist and whose beatitude is accessible to us is not only self -sufficing and perfect in every hour, but in the act of seeing and the thing seen; the seer and the spectacle, the subject, and the object, are one. We see the world piece by piece, as the sun, the moon, the animal, the tree; but the whole, of which these are shining parts, is the soul. Only by the. the vision of that wisdom can the horoscope of the ages be read .... ".'
In some respects, Henry David Thoreau was even more than Emerson attracted to Oriental thought and philosophy. For while Emerson found the Hindu doctrines of soul congenial to his own ideas about man's relationship to the universe. Thoreau found in Hindu scriptures away of life with which he felt a profound affinity. When Thoreau began his intensive study of Hindu Scriptures, he wrote in his journal. "I cannot read a sentence in the book of the Hindus without being elevated upon the table-land of the Ghauts. The impression which those sublime sentences
made on me last night has awakened me before any crow crowing. The simple life here in described confers on us a degree of freedom even in perusal wants so easily and gracefully satisfied that they seem like a more refined pleasure and repleteness." Later, in his first book, he said: " Any moral philosophy is exceeding rare. This of Manu addresses our privacy more than most. It is a more private and familiar and at the same time a more public and universal work that is spoken in parlor or pulpit nowadays. As our domestic fowls are said to have their origins in the wild peasant of India, so our domestic thoughts have their prototypes in the thoughts of her philosophers... Most books belong to the house and street only, and in the fields, their leaves feel very thin... But this, as if proceeds from, so I address, what is deepest and most abiding in man. It belongs to the noontide of the day, the midsummer of the year, and after the snows have melted, and the waters evaporated in the spring, still its truth speaks freshly to our experience ..... ".

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The difficulty in identifying particular influences on transcendentalism arises
from


AIts eclectic nature of acquainting with all philosophical doctrines.

BIts being equidistant from both oriental and western schools of region

CThe apparent paradoxes in Christian mysticism and-Suddhist ideology.

DUs over-dependence on Bhagavad Gita and Vishnupurana.

Answer: Option A

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Read the passage and answer the questions that follow on the basis of the information provided in the passage.

 Vedanta philosophy was one of several thought currents from abroad that reached New England in the early decades of the 191h century and contributed to the thinking of Emerson and Thoreau. Emerson's interest in the sacred writing of the East probably began during his Harvard days and continued throughout his life. He knew Laws of Manu, Vishnupurana, the Bhagavad-Gita, and Katha Upanishad. There are numerous references to these scriptures in his journals and Essays. Thoreau too was introduced to Oriental writing while still at Harvard. His initial contact was with an essay in oriental poetry by Sir William Jones. In 1841, at the age of 24, he began an intensive study of Hindu religious books. In the January 1843 issues of "The Dial", Thoreau published selected passages from Laws of Manu. From a French version of the Sanskrit Harivansa he translated a story, "The Transmigration of seven Brahmans," and in "The Dial" of January 1844, he published excerpts from Buddhist scriptures under the title "The preaching of Buddha". Emerson, Thoreau, and other transcendentalists interested in the concept of "self-hood, found in Hindu scripture well-elaborated doctrine of self. Hindu scripture tells us that the central core of one's self (Antaratman) is identifiable with the cosmic whole (Brahman). The Upanishads state, "The self within you, the resplendent, immortal person is the internal self of air things and is the universal Brahman". Concepts similar to this cardinal doctrine of Vedanta appear in the writings of 2 the Transcendentalists. But there are many ideological similarities among oriental literature, the Neoplatonic doctrines, Christian mysticism, and the philosophy of the German idealists such as Kant and Schelling. And, since the Transcendentalists were acquainted with all of these writings, it is not always possible to identify specific influences.
Nevertheless, the striking parallels between Transcendentalist writing and Oriental thought make it clear that there was a spiritual kinship. In "Plato or the philosopher," Emerson writes that "the conception of fundamental Unity"-the "ecstasy" of losing "all being in one Being" - finds its highest expression chiefly in the Indian. Scriptures, in the Vedas, the Bhagavad Gita, and the Vishnu Purana." In this essay, Emerson quotes Krishna speaking to a sage: "You are fit to apprehend that you are not distinct from me that which I am, you are, and that also in this world, with its gods and heroes and mankind. Men contemplate distinctions because they are stupefied with ignorance," "What is the great end of all, you shall now learn from me. It is soul, - one in all bodies, pervading uniform, perfect, preeminent over nature, exempt from birth, growth, and decay, omnipresent, made up of true knowledge, independent, unconnected with unrealities, with name, species and the rest, in time past, present and to come. The knowledge that this spirit, which is essentially one is in one's own and in all other bodies, is the wisdom of one who knows the unity of things." In formulating his own concept of the Over-soul, Emerson might well be quoting Krishna once again: 'We live in succession, in the division, in part, in particles. Meantime within man is the soul of the whole; the wise silence; the universal beauty to which every part and particle is equally related; the eternal ONE. And this deep power in which we exist and whose beatitude is accessible to us is not only self -sufficing and perfect in every hour, but in the act of seeing and the thing seen; the seer and the spectacle, the subject, and the object, are one. We see the world piece by piece, as the sun, the moon, the animal, the tree; but the whole, of which these are shining parts, is the soul. Only by the. the vision of that wisdom can the horoscope of the ages be read .... ".'
In some respects, Henry David Thoreau was even more than Emerson attracted to Oriental thought and philosophy. For while Emerson found the Hindu doctrines of soul congenial to his own ideas about man's relationship to the universe. Thoreau found in Hindu scriptures away of life with which he felt a profound affinity. When Thoreau began his intensive study of Hindu Scriptures, he wrote in his journal. "I cannot read a sentence in the book of the Hindus without being elevated upon the table-land of the Ghauts. The impression which those sublime sentences
made on me last night has awakened me before any crow crowing. The simple life here in described confers on us a degree of freedom even in perusal wants so easily and gracefully satisfied that they seem like a more refined pleasure and repleteness." Later, in his first book, he said: " Any moral philosophy is exceeding rare. This of Manu addresses our privacy more than most. It is a more private and familiar and at the same time a more public and universal work that is spoken in parlor or pulpit nowadays. As our domestic fowls are said to have their origins in the wild peasant of India, so our domestic thoughts have their prototypes in the thoughts of her philosophers... Most books belong to the house and street only, and in the fields, their leaves feel very thin... But this, as if proceeds from, so I address, what is deepest and most abiding in man. It belongs to the noontide of the day, the midsummer of the year, and after the snows have melted, and the waters evaporated in the spring, still its truth speaks freshly to our experience ..... ".

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Which of the following best explains Vedanta?


AThe sacred writing of the East

BThe self is identifiable with the universal whole.

CThe spiritual side of human life.

DThe process of being and becoming.

Answer: Option B

Explanation:

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Read the passage and answer the questions that follow on the basis of the information provided in the passage.

 Vedanta philosophy was one of several thought currents from abroad that reached New England in the early decades of the 191h century and contributed to the thinking of Emerson and Thoreau. Emerson's interest in the sacred writing of the East probably began during his Harvard days and continued throughout his life. He knew Laws of Manu, Vishnupurana, the Bhagavad-Gita, and Katha Upanishad. There are numerous references to these scriptures in his journals and Essays. Thoreau too was introduced to Oriental writing while still at Harvard. His initial contact was with an essay in oriental poetry by Sir William Jones. In 1841, at the age of 24, he began an intensive study of Hindu religious books. In the January 1843 issues of "The Dial", Thoreau published selected passages from Laws of Manu. From a French version of the Sanskrit Harivansa he translated a story, "The Transmigration of seven Brahmans," and in "The Dial" of January 1844, he published excerpts from Buddhist scriptures under the title "The preaching of Buddha". Emerson, Thoreau, and other transcendentalists interested in the concept of "self-hood, found in Hindu scripture well-elaborated doctrine of self. Hindu scripture tells us that the central core of one's self (Antaratman) is identifiable with the cosmic whole (Brahman). The Upanishads state, "The self within you, the resplendent, immortal person is the internal self of air things and is the universal Brahman". Concepts similar to this cardinal doctrine of Vedanta appear in the writings of 2 the Transcendentalists. But there are many ideological similarities among oriental literature, the Neoplatonic doctrines, Christian mysticism, and the philosophy of the German idealists such as Kant and Schelling. And, since the Transcendentalists were acquainted with all of these writings, it is not always possible to identify specific influences.
Nevertheless, the striking parallels between Transcendentalist writing and Oriental thought make it clear that there was a spiritual kinship. In "Plato or the philosopher," Emerson writes that "the conception of fundamental Unity"-the "ecstasy" of losing "all being in one Being" - finds its highest expression chiefly in the Indian. Scriptures, in the Vedas, the Bhagavad Gita, and the Vishnu Purana." In this essay, Emerson quotes Krishna speaking to a sage: "You are fit to apprehend that you are not distinct from me that which I am, you are, and that also in this world, with its gods and heroes and mankind. Men contemplate distinctions because they are stupefied with ignorance," "What is the great end of all, you shall now learn from me. It is soul, - one in all bodies, pervading uniform, perfect, preeminent over nature, exempt from birth, growth, and decay, omnipresent, made up of true knowledge, independent, unconnected with unrealities, with name, species and the rest, in time past, present and to come. The knowledge that this spirit, which is essentially one is in one's own and in all other bodies, is the wisdom of one who knows the unity of things." In formulating his own concept of the Over-soul, Emerson might well be quoting Krishna once again: 'We live in succession, in the division, in part, in particles. Meantime within man is the soul of the whole; the wise silence; the universal beauty to which every part and particle is equally related; the eternal ONE. And this deep power in which we exist and whose beatitude is accessible to us is not only self -sufficing and perfect in every hour, but in the act of seeing and the thing seen; the seer and the spectacle, the subject, and the object, are one. We see the world piece by piece, as the sun, the moon, the animal, the tree; but the whole, of which these are shining parts, is the soul. Only by the. the vision of that wisdom can the horoscope of the ages be read .... ".'
In some respects, Henry David Thoreau was even more than Emerson attracted to Oriental thought and philosophy. For while Emerson found the Hindu doctrines of soul congenial to his own ideas about man's relationship to the universe. Thoreau found in Hindu scriptures away of life with which he felt a profound affinity. When Thoreau began his intensive study of Hindu Scriptures, he wrote in his journal. "I cannot read a sentence in the book of the Hindus without being elevated upon the table-land of the Ghauts. The impression which those sublime sentences
made on me last night has awakened me before any crow crowing. The simple life here in described confers on us a degree of freedom even in perusal wants so easily and gracefully satisfied that they seem like a more refined pleasure and repleteness." Later, in his first book, he said: " Any moral philosophy is exceeding rare. This of Manu addresses our privacy more than most. It is a more private and familiar and at the same time a more public and universal work that is spoken in parlor or pulpit nowadays. As our domestic fowls are said to have their origins in the wild peasant of India, so our domestic thoughts have their prototypes in the thoughts of her philosophers... Most books belong to the house and street only, and in the fields, their leaves feel very thin... But this, as if proceeds from, so I address, what is deepest and most abiding in man. It belongs to the noontide of the day, the midsummer of the year, and after the snows have melted, and the waters evaporated in the spring, still its truth speaks freshly to our experience ..... ".

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The lines "You are fit to apprehend that ... is the wisdom of one who knows the unity of things" can be summarized as


AThere is no birth to a soul and it is the ignorant man who comes to life again and again

BTrue knowledge is independent, uniform and that which dominates over nature.

CPast, present and future are non-existent and are merely constructs of the mind.

DA wise man knows that the soul is immortal and is present in everyone and everything and that it merges with the cosmic whole

Answer: Option D

Explanation:

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75 / 263

Read the passage and answer the questions that follow on the basis of the information provided in the passage.

 Vedanta philosophy was one of several thought currents from abroad that reached New England in the early decades of the 191h century and contributed to the thinking of Emerson and Thoreau. Emerson's interest in the sacred writing of the East probably began during his Harvard days and continued throughout his life. He knew Laws of Manu, Vishnupurana, the Bhagavad-Gita, and Katha Upanishad. There are numerous references to these scriptures in his journals and Essays. Thoreau too was introduced to Oriental writing while still at Harvard. His initial contact was with an essay in oriental poetry by Sir William Jones. In 1841, at the age of 24, he began an intensive study of Hindu religious books. In the January 1843 issues of "The Dial", Thoreau published selected passages from Laws of Manu. From a French version of the Sanskrit Harivansa he translated a story, "The Transmigration of seven Brahmans," and in "The Dial" of January 1844, he published excerpts from Buddhist scriptures under the title "The preaching of Buddha". Emerson, Thoreau, and other transcendentalists interested in the concept of "self-hood, found in Hindu scripture well-elaborated doctrine of self. Hindu scripture tells us that the central core of one's self (Antaratman) is identifiable with the cosmic whole (Brahman). The Upanishads state, "The self within you, the resplendent, immortal person is the internal self of air things and is the universal Brahman". Concepts similar to this cardinal doctrine of Vedanta appear in the writings of 2 the Transcendentalists. But there are many ideological similarities among oriental literature, the Neoplatonic doctrines, Christian mysticism, and the philosophy of the German idealists such as Kant and Schelling. And, since the Transcendentalists were acquainted with all of these writings, it is not always possible to identify specific influences.
Nevertheless, the striking parallels between Transcendentalist writing and Oriental thought make it clear that there was a spiritual kinship. In "Plato or the philosopher," Emerson writes that "the conception of fundamental Unity"-the "ecstasy" of losing "all being in one Being" - finds its highest expression chiefly in the Indian. Scriptures, in the Vedas, the Bhagavad Gita, and the Vishnu Purana." In this essay, Emerson quotes Krishna speaking to a sage: "You are fit to apprehend that you are not distinct from me that which I am, you are, and that also in this world, with its gods and heroes and mankind. Men contemplate distinctions because they are stupefied with ignorance," "What is the great end of all, you shall now learn from me. It is soul, - one in all bodies, pervading uniform, perfect, preeminent over nature, exempt from birth, growth, and decay, omnipresent, made up of true knowledge, independent, unconnected with unrealities, with name, species and the rest, in time past, present and to come. The knowledge that this spirit, which is essentially one is in one's own and in all other bodies, is the wisdom of one who knows the unity of things." In formulating his own concept of the Over-soul, Emerson might well be quoting Krishna once again: 'We live in succession, in the division, in part, in particles. Meantime within man is the soul of the whole; the wise silence; the universal beauty to which every part and particle is equally related; the eternal ONE. And this deep power in which we exist and whose beatitude is accessible to us is not only self -sufficing and perfect in every hour, but in the act of seeing and the thing seen; the seer and the spectacle, the subject, and the object, are one. We see the world piece by piece, as the sun, the moon, the animal, the tree; but the whole, of which these are shining parts, is the soul. Only by the. the vision of that wisdom can the horoscope of the ages be read .... ".'
In some respects, Henry David Thoreau was even more than Emerson attracted to Oriental thought and philosophy. For while Emerson found the Hindu doctrines of soul congenial to his own ideas about man's relationship to the universe. Thoreau found in Hindu scriptures away of life with which he felt a profound affinity. When Thoreau began his intensive study of Hindu Scriptures, he wrote in his journal. "I cannot read a sentence in the book of the Hindus without being elevated upon the table-land of the Ghauts. The impression which those sublime sentences
made on me last night has awakened me before any crow crowing. The simple life here in described confers on us a degree of freedom even in perusal wants so easily and gracefully satisfied that they seem like a more refined pleasure and repleteness." Later, in his first book, he said: " Any moral philosophy is exceeding rare. This of Manu addresses our privacy more than most. It is a more private and familiar and at the same time a more public and universal work that is spoken in parlor or pulpit nowadays. As our domestic fowls are said to have their origins in the wild peasant of India, so our domestic thoughts have their prototypes in the thoughts of her philosophers... Most books belong to the house and street only, and in the fields, their leaves feel very thin... But this, as if proceeds from, so I address, what is deepest and most abiding in man. It belongs to the noontide of the day, the midsummer of the year, and after the snows have melted, and the waters evaporated in the spring, still its truth speaks freshly to our experience ..... ".

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Oversoul' referred to in the passage is,


AKrishna's perception of the 'self'.

BEmerson's concept of the eternal soul.

CCoined by transcendentalists to mean the 'cosmos'.

DSynonymous with the wise man

Answer: Option B

Explanation:

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76 / 263

Read the passage and answer the questions that follow on the basis of the information provided in the passage.

 In poetry in its higher reaches is more philosophical than history, because it presents the memorable types of men and things apart from non-meaning circumstances, so, in its primary substance and texture poetry is more philosophical than prose because it is nearer to our immediate experience. Poetry breaks up the trite conceptions designated by current wards into the sensuous qualities out of which those conceptions were originally put together. We name what we conceive and believe in, not what we see; things, not images; souls, not voices and silhouettes. This naming, with the whole education of the senses which it accompanies, subserves the uses of life; in order to tread, our way through the labyrinth of objects which assaults us, we must make a great selection in our sensuous experience; half of what we see and hear we must pass over as insignificant, while we piece out the other half with such an ideal complement as is necessary to turn it into a fixed and well-ordered conception of the world. This labor of apperception and understanding, this selling of the material meaning of experience, is enshrined in our workday language arid ideas; ideas which are literally poetic in the sense that 'they are 'made' for every conception in an adult mind is a fiction), but which are at the same time prosaic because they are made economically, by abstraction, and for use. When the child of poetic genius, who has learned this intellectual and utilitarian language in the cradle, goes afield and gathers for himself the aspects of nature, he begins to. encumber his mind with the many living impressions which the intellect rejected, and which the language of the intellect can hardly convey; he labors with his nameless burden of perception, and wastes himself in aimless impulses of emotion and revere, until finally the method of some art offers a vent to his inspiration, or to such part of it as can survive the test of time and the discipline of expression. The poet retains by nature the innocence of the eye, or recovers it easily; he disintegrates the fictions of common perception into their sensuous elements, gathers thee again into chance groups as the accidents of his environment or the affinities of his temperament may conjoin them ; and this wealth of sensation and this freedom of fancy, which make an extraordinary ferment in his ignorant heart, presently bubble over into some kind of utterance. The fullness and sensuousness of such effusions bring them nearer to our actual perceptions, than common discourse could come; yet they may easily seem remote, overloaded, and obscure to those accustomed to think entirely in symbols, and never to be interrupted in the algebraic rapidity of their thinking by a moment's pause and examination of heart, nor ever to plunge for a moment into that torrent of sensation and imagery over which the bridge of prosaic associations habitually carries us safe and dry to some conventional act. How slight that bridge commonly is, how much an affair of trestle and wire, we can hardly conceive until we have trained ourselves to an extreme sharpness of introspection. But psychologists have discovered, what laymen generally will confess, that we hurry by the procession of over mental images as we do by the traffic of the street, intent on business, gladly forgetting the noise and movement of the scene, and looking only for the corner we would turn or the door we would enter in our alert rest moment the depths of the soul are still dreaming; the real world stands drawn in bare outline against a background of chaos and unrest. Our logical thoughts dominate experience only as the parallels and meridians make a checkerboard of the sea. 'they guide our voyage without controlling the waves, which toss forever in spite of our ability to ride over them to our chosen ends. Sanity is a madness put to good uses; waking life is a dream controlled. Out of the neglected riches of this dream, the poet fetches his wares. He dips into the chaos that underlies the rational shell of the world and brings up some superfluous image, some emotion dropped by the way, and reattaches it to the present object; he reinstates things unnecessarily, he emphasizes things ignored, he paints it again into the landscape the tints which the intellect has allowed to fade from it. If he seems sometimes to obscure a fact, it is only because he is restoring an experience. The first element which the intellect rejects in forming its ideas of things is the emotion which accompanies the perception, and this emotion is the first thing the poet restores. He stops at the image because he stops to enjoy. He wanders· into the bypaths of association because the bypaths are delightful The love of beauty which made him give measure and cadence to his words, the love of harmony which made him rhyme them, reappear in his imagination and make him select there also the material that is itself beautiful, or capable of assuming beautiful forms. The link that binds together the ideas, sometimes so wide apart, which his wit assimilates, is most often the link of emotion; they have in common some element of the beauty or of horror.

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In the first paragraph the writer establishes that poetry is more philosophical than


AHistory because the function of poetry is to sift through the circumstances and choose only the significant for its theme

BProse, because prose deals with our immediate experiences whereas poetry deals with the sublime experiences.

CBoth (1) and (2).

DNone of these

Answer: Option D

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Read the passage and answer the questions that follow on the basis of the information provided in the passage.

 In poetry in its higher reaches is more philosophical than history, because it presents the memorable types of men and things apart from non-meaning circumstances, so, in its primary substance and texture poetry is more philosophical than prose because it is nearer to our immediate experience. Poetry breaks up the trite conceptions designated by current wards into the sensuous qualities out of which those conceptions were originally put together. We name what we conceive and believe in, not what we see; things, not images; souls, not voices and silhouettes. This naming, with the whole education of the senses which it accompanies, subserves the uses of life; in order to tread, our way through the labyrinth of objects which assaults us, we must make a great selection in our sensuous experience; half of what we see and hear we must pass over as insignificant, while we piece out the other half with such an ideal complement as is necessary to turn it into a fixed and well-ordered conception of the world. This labor of apperception and understanding, this selling of the material meaning of experience, is enshrined in our workday language arid ideas; ideas which are literally poetic in the sense that 'they are 'made' for every conception in an adult mind is a fiction), but which are at the same time prosaic because they are made economically, by abstraction, and for use. When the child of poetic genius, who has learned this intellectual and utilitarian language in the cradle, goes afield and gathers for himself the aspects of nature, he begins to. encumber his mind with the many living impressions which the intellect rejected, and which the language of the intellect can hardly convey; he labors with his nameless burden of perception, and wastes himself in aimless impulses of emotion and revere, until finally the method of some art offers a vent to his inspiration, or to such part of it as can survive the test of time and the discipline of expression. The poet retains by nature the innocence of the eye, or recovers it easily; he disintegrates the fictions of common perception into their sensuous elements, gathers thee again into chance groups as the accidents of his environment or the affinities of his temperament may conjoin them ; and this wealth of sensation and this freedom of fancy, which make an extraordinary ferment in his ignorant heart, presently bubble over into some kind of utterance. The fullness and sensuousness of such effusions bring them nearer to our actual perceptions, than common discourse could come; yet they may easily seem remote, overloaded, and obscure to those accustomed to think entirely in symbols, and never to be interrupted in the algebraic rapidity of their thinking by a moment's pause and examination of heart, nor ever to plunge for a moment into that torrent of sensation and imagery over which the bridge of prosaic associations habitually carries us safe and dry to some conventional act. How slight that bridge commonly is, how much an affair of trestle and wire, we can hardly conceive until we have trained ourselves to an extreme sharpness of introspection. But psychologists have discovered, what laymen generally will confess, that we hurry by the procession of over mental images as we do by the traffic of the street, intent on business, gladly forgetting the noise and movement of the scene, and looking only for the corner we would turn or the door we would enter in our alert rest moment the depths of the soul are still dreaming; the real world stands drawn in bare outline against a background of chaos and unrest. Our logical thoughts dominate experience only as the parallels and meridians make a checkerboard of the sea. 'they guide our voyage without controlling the waves, which toss forever in spite of our ability to ride over them to our chosen ends. Sanity is a madness put to good uses; waking life is a dream controlled. Out of the neglected riches of this dream, the poet fetches his wares. He dips into the chaos that underlies the rational shell of the world and brings up some superfluous image, some emotion dropped by the way, and reattaches it to the present object; he reinstates things unnecessarily, he emphasizes things ignored, he paints it again into the landscape the tints which the intellect has allowed to fade from it. If he seems sometimes to obscure a fact, it is only because he is restoring an experience. The first element which the intellect rejects in forming its ideas of things is the emotion which accompanies the perception, and this emotion is the first thing the poet restores. He stops at the image because he stops to enjoy. He wanders· into the bypaths of association because the bypaths are delightful The love of beauty which made him give measure and cadence to his words, the love of harmony which made him rhyme them, reappear in his imagination and make him select there also the material that is itself beautiful, or capable of assuming beautiful forms. The link that binds together the ideas, sometimes so wide apart, which his wit assimilates, is most often the link of emotion; they have in common some element of the beauty or of horror.

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According to the writer, the process of 'naming' in relation to our conception and belief, applies to be:

i. All that we see including images and silhouettes.
ii. Objects and the material meaning of experiences.
iii. Voices, souls and silhouettes.


AAll the above three

Bi only

Cii only

Diii only

Answer: Option C

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Read the passage and answer the questions that follow on the basis of the information provided in the passage.

 In poetry in its higher reaches is more philosophical than history, because it presents the memorable types of men and things apart from non-meaning circumstances, so, in its primary substance and texture poetry is more philosophical than prose because it is nearer to our immediate experience. Poetry breaks up the trite conceptions designated by current wards into the sensuous qualities out of which those conceptions were originally put together. We name what we conceive and believe in, not what we see; things, not images; souls, not voices and silhouettes. This naming, with the whole education of the senses which it accompanies, subserves the uses of life; in order to tread, our way through the labyrinth of objects which assaults us, we must make a great selection in our sensuous experience; half of what we see and hear we must pass over as insignificant, while we piece out the other half with such an ideal complement as is necessary to turn it into a fixed and well-ordered conception of the world. This labor of apperception and understanding, this selling of the material meaning of experience, is enshrined in our workday language arid ideas; ideas which are literally poetic in the sense that 'they are 'made' for every conception in an adult mind is a fiction), but which are at the same time prosaic because they are made economically, by abstraction, and for use. When the child of poetic genius, who has learned this intellectual and utilitarian language in the cradle, goes afield and gathers for himself the aspects of nature, he begins to. encumber his mind with the many living impressions which the intellect rejected, and which the language of the intellect can hardly convey; he labors with his nameless burden of perception, and wastes himself in aimless impulses of emotion and revere, until finally the method of some art offers a vent to his inspiration, or to such part of it as can survive the test of time and the discipline of expression. The poet retains by nature the innocence of the eye, or recovers it easily; he disintegrates the fictions of common perception into their sensuous elements, gathers thee again into chance groups as the accidents of his environment or the affinities of his temperament may conjoin them ; and this wealth of sensation and this freedom of fancy, which make an extraordinary ferment in his ignorant heart, presently bubble over into some kind of utterance. The fullness and sensuousness of such effusions bring them nearer to our actual perceptions, than common discourse could come; yet they may easily seem remote, overloaded, and obscure to those accustomed to think entirely in symbols, and never to be interrupted in the algebraic rapidity of their thinking by a moment's pause and examination of heart, nor ever to plunge for a moment into that torrent of sensation and imagery over which the bridge of prosaic associations habitually carries us safe and dry to some conventional act. How slight that bridge commonly is, how much an affair of trestle and wire, we can hardly conceive until we have trained ourselves to an extreme sharpness of introspection. But psychologists have discovered, what laymen generally will confess, that we hurry by the procession of over mental images as we do by the traffic of the street, intent on business, gladly forgetting the noise and movement of the scene, and looking only for the corner we would turn or the door we would enter in our alert rest moment the depths of the soul are still dreaming; the real world stands drawn in bare outline against a background of chaos and unrest. Our logical thoughts dominate experience only as the parallels and meridians make a checkerboard of the sea. 'they guide our voyage without controlling the waves, which toss forever in spite of our ability to ride over them to our chosen ends. Sanity is a madness put to good uses; waking life is a dream controlled. Out of the neglected riches of this dream, the poet fetches his wares. He dips into the chaos that underlies the rational shell of the world and brings up some superfluous image, some emotion dropped by the way, and reattaches it to the present object; he reinstates things unnecessarily, he emphasizes things ignored, he paints it again into the landscape the tints which the intellect has allowed to fade from it. If he seems sometimes to obscure a fact, it is only because he is restoring an experience. The first element which the intellect rejects in forming its ideas of things is the emotion which accompanies the perception, and this emotion is the first thing the poet restores. He stops at the image because he stops to enjoy. He wanders· into the bypaths of association because the bypaths are delightful The love of beauty which made him give measure and cadence to his words, the love of harmony which made him rhyme them, reappear in his imagination and make him select there also the material that is itself beautiful, or capable of assuming beautiful forms. The link that binds together the ideas, sometimes so wide apart, which his wit assimilates, is most often the link of emotion; they have in common some element of the beauty or of horror.

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The second and third paragraphs can best be summarised as :


AThe poetic genius attempts to generate expressions for the truths that the utilitarian mind and language have in the first place rejected'

BThe poetic genius entirely wastes himself in directionless instincts and dreaming in order to give expression to the partly experienced truths.

CThe poetic genius continuously endeavors to attribute meaning to the apparently meaningless objects and visions, through a language familiar to all

DThe poetic genius makes use of the intellectual and utilitarian language that exists in order to create another form of language suitable ,to express the common perceptions and sensuous elements.

Answer: Option A

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Read the passage and answer the questions that follow on the basis of the information provided in the passage.

 In poetry in its higher reaches is more philosophical than history, because it presents the memorable types of men and things apart from non-meaning circumstances, so, in its primary substance and texture poetry is more philosophical than prose because it is nearer to our immediate experience. Poetry breaks up the trite conceptions designated by current wards into the sensuous qualities out of which those conceptions were originally put together. We name what we conceive and believe in, not what we see; things, not images; souls, not voices and silhouettes. This naming, with the whole education of the senses which it accompanies, subserves the uses of life; in order to tread, our way through the labyrinth of objects which assaults us, we must make a great selection in our sensuous experience; half of what we see and hear we must pass over as insignificant, while we piece out the other half with such an ideal complement as is necessary to turn it into a fixed and well-ordered conception of the world. This labor of apperception and understanding, this selling of the material meaning of experience, is enshrined in our workday language arid ideas; ideas which are literally poetic in the sense that 'they are 'made' for every conception in an adult mind is a fiction), but which are at the same time prosaic because they are made economically, by abstraction, and for use. When the child of poetic genius, who has learned this intellectual and utilitarian language in the cradle, goes afield and gathers for himself the aspects of nature, he begins to. encumber his mind with the many living impressions which the intellect rejected, and which the language of the intellect can hardly convey; he labors with his nameless burden of perception, and wastes himself in aimless impulses of emotion and revere, until finally the method of some art offers a vent to his inspiration, or to such part of it as can survive the test of time and the discipline of expression. The poet retains by nature the innocence of the eye, or recovers it easily; he disintegrates the fictions of common perception into their sensuous elements, gathers thee again into chance groups as the accidents of his environment or the affinities of his temperament may conjoin them ; and this wealth of sensation and this freedom of fancy, which make an extraordinary ferment in his ignorant heart, presently bubble over into some kind of utterance. The fullness and sensuousness of such effusions bring them nearer to our actual perceptions, than common discourse could come; yet they may easily seem remote, overloaded, and obscure to those accustomed to think entirely in symbols, and never to be interrupted in the algebraic rapidity of their thinking by a moment's pause and examination of heart, nor ever to plunge for a moment into that torrent of sensation and imagery over which the bridge of prosaic associations habitually carries us safe and dry to some conventional act. How slight that bridge commonly is, how much an affair of trestle and wire, we can hardly conceive until we have trained ourselves to an extreme sharpness of introspection. But psychologists have discovered, what laymen generally will confess, that we hurry by the procession of over mental images as we do by the traffic of the street, intent on business, gladly forgetting the noise and movement of the scene, and looking only for the corner we would turn or the door we would enter in our alert rest moment the depths of the soul are still dreaming; the real world stands drawn in bare outline against a background of chaos and unrest. Our logical thoughts dominate experience only as the parallels and meridians make a checkerboard of the sea. 'they guide our voyage without controlling the waves, which toss forever in spite of our ability to ride over them to our chosen ends. Sanity is a madness put to good uses; waking life is a dream controlled. Out of the neglected riches of this dream, the poet fetches his wares. He dips into the chaos that underlies the rational shell of the world and brings up some superfluous image, some emotion dropped by the way, and reattaches it to the present object; he reinstates things unnecessarily, he emphasizes things ignored, he paints it again into the landscape the tints which the intellect has allowed to fade from it. If he seems sometimes to obscure a fact, it is only because he is restoring an experience. The first element which the intellect rejects in forming its ideas of things is the emotion which accompanies the perception, and this emotion is the first thing the poet restores. He stops at the image because he stops to enjoy. He wanders· into the bypaths of association because the bypaths are delightful The love of beauty which made him give measure and cadence to his words, the love of harmony which made him rhyme them, reappear in his imagination and make him select there also the material that is itself beautiful, or capable of assuming beautiful forms. The link that binds together the ideas, sometimes so wide apart, which his wit assimilates, is most often the link of emotion; they have in common some element of the beauty or of horror.

Read Full Paragraph

"Sanity is a madness put to good uses; waking life is a dream controlled." Which of the following, according to the passage reinforces the quotation?


AWe are able to successfully conduct ourselves in the business of the material world by ignoring the mysteries and complexities of the world around us.

BEvery human, as he moves through the material world, does carry deep within himself, a perception of the complexities and the mysteries of the world around him even though, unmindful of them at the moment.

CPoetry is generally not fully understood by a person unless he is slightly 'insane' in a way and is a 'dreamer' to an extent.

DSanity is only when one completely ignores the mysteries and complexities of life, and when one consistently rejects the 'dreamer' in oneself to reach the practical goal that one has set for oneself in the real world.

Answer: Option B

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Read the passage and answer the questions that follow on the basis of the information provided in the passage.

 In poetry in its higher reaches is more philosophical than history, because it presents the memorable types of men and things apart from non-meaning circumstances, so, in its primary substance and texture poetry is more philosophical than prose because it is nearer to our immediate experience. Poetry breaks up the trite conceptions designated by current wards into the sensuous qualities out of which those conceptions were originally put together. We name what we conceive and believe in, not what we see; things, not images; souls, not voices and silhouettes. This naming, with the whole education of the senses which it accompanies, subserves the uses of life; in order to tread, our way through the labyrinth of objects which assaults us, we must make a great selection in our sensuous experience; half of what we see and hear we must pass over as insignificant, while we piece out the other half with such an ideal complement as is necessary to turn it into a fixed and well-ordered conception of the world. This labor of apperception and understanding, this selling of the material meaning of experience, is enshrined in our workday language arid ideas; ideas which are literally poetic in the sense that 'they are 'made' for every conception in an adult mind is a fiction), but which are at the same time prosaic because they are made economically, by abstraction, and for use. When the child of poetic genius, who has learned this intellectual and utilitarian language in the cradle, goes afield and gathers for himself the aspects of nature, he begins to. encumber his mind with the many living impressions which the intellect rejected, and which the language of the intellect can hardly convey; he labors with his nameless burden of perception, and wastes himself in aimless impulses of emotion and revere, until finally the method of some art offers a vent to his inspiration, or to such part of it as can survive the test of time and the discipline of expression. The poet retains by nature the innocence of the eye, or recovers it easily; he disintegrates the fictions of common perception into their sensuous elements, gathers thee again into chance groups as the accidents of his environment or the affinities of his temperament may conjoin them ; and this wealth of sensation and this freedom of fancy, which make an extraordinary ferment in his ignorant heart, presently bubble over into some kind of utterance. The fullness and sensuousness of such effusions bring them nearer to our actual perceptions, than common discourse could come; yet they may easily seem remote, overloaded, and obscure to those accustomed to think entirely in symbols, and never to be interrupted in the algebraic rapidity of their thinking by a moment's pause and examination of heart, nor ever to plunge for a moment into that torrent of sensation and imagery over which the bridge of prosaic associations habitually carries us safe and dry to some conventional act. How slight that bridge commonly is, how much an affair of trestle and wire, we can hardly conceive until we have trained ourselves to an extreme sharpness of introspection. But psychologists have discovered, what laymen generally will confess, that we hurry by the procession of over mental images as we do by the traffic of the street, intent on business, gladly forgetting the noise and movement of the scene, and looking only for the corner we would turn or the door we would enter in our alert rest moment the depths of the soul are still dreaming; the real world stands drawn in bare outline against a background of chaos and unrest. Our logical thoughts dominate experience only as the parallels and meridians make a checkerboard of the sea. 'they guide our voyage without controlling the waves, which toss forever in spite of our ability to ride over them to our chosen ends. Sanity is a madness put to good uses; waking life is a dream controlled. Out of the neglected riches of this dream, the poet fetches his wares. He dips into the chaos that underlies the rational shell of the world and brings up some superfluous image, some emotion dropped by the way, and reattaches it to the present object; he reinstates things unnecessarily, he emphasizes things ignored, he paints it again into the landscape the tints which the intellect has allowed to fade from it. If he seems sometimes to obscure a fact, it is only because he is restoring an experience. The first element which the intellect rejects in forming its ideas of things is the emotion which accompanies the perception, and this emotion is the first thing the poet restores. He stops at the image because he stops to enjoy. He wanders· into the bypaths of association because the bypaths are delightful The love of beauty which made him give measure and cadence to his words, the love of harmony which made him rhyme them, reappear in his imagination and make him select there also the material that is itself beautiful, or capable of assuming beautiful forms. The link that binds together the ideas, sometimes so wide apart, which his wit assimilates, is most often the link of emotion; they have in common some element of the beauty or of horror.

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Which of the following inferences can be drawn from the last paragraph of the passage?

i. Poetry essentially deals with the grandeur of life in all its aspect.
ii. Poetry may deal with the insignificant and the non-obvious in everyday life.
iii. Poetry attempts to relate the contrary and even the opposite ideas through emotion.
iv. Poetry may turn even horror into beauty.


AAll of the above.

Bi & ii only

Ci & iv only

Dii & iii only

Answer: Option D

Explanation:

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